Thursday, July 7, 2022

Introduction to Fiber Optic Internet

Fiber optic internet has become the first choice for tech-savvy users nowadays. The users who require high speed, buffer-free, and high bandwidth internet would certainly prefer fiber optic internet over copper-based internet.

Today, most domestic, and industrial internet-based applications are run over fiber-based internet. It can be rightly said that fiber optic internet has taken over traditional copper-based internet or cellular internet in many applications. Having said that, you may think about what makes fiber optic internet better than traditional copper-based internet.

This blog post aims to answer this question by introducing you to the working of fiber optic internet and its types.

Fiber optic internet is the internet-zone network created by replacing conventional copper cables with fiber optic cables. A fiber optic cable features several glass strands through which the data signals are transmitted in optical pulses.

The transmission of optical pulses is higher in fiber optic cables compared to electrical signals in copper cables. The fiber-optic network for internet-zone formation involves the integration of fiber optic devices like modems, routers, fiber cables, connectors, Fiber optic media converters, etc. All these devices make the best use of fiber optic technology and they help reduce the problems of electromagnetic interference, noise, or slow traffic. Thus, by using a fiber-optic network, a high speed and buffer-free internet can be accessed for internet-based operations.

The fiber-optic network for the internet is distinguished into different types based on their application. The next section discusses three such important types for your reference.

Get Introduced to Three Most Popular Fiber Optic Internet Types

The three types of fiber optic internet are listed below.

  1. FTTH or FTTP: Fiber to the home or fiber to the premises is the first type of fiber-optic network. In this type, the fiber optic connection is made right from the internet service provider (ISP) to your home or office. This type is connected if limited premises access to high-speed internet is required. Fiber optic routers are used for limited access to fiber-based internet service provision.
  2. FTTC: Fiber to the curb (FTTC) is the type of fiber optic network internet in which the source to curb fiber optic cables are connected. The curb is located at the center of the locality from where the internet is supplied to houses or offices. For businesses, or inter-organisational internet access FTTC can be utilized. If curb to delivery port distance is less, then copper cables can be used from the curb to router connections.
  3. FTTN: Fiber to the node (FTTN) is the type of fiber optic internet network used for providing internet to hundreds of delivery ports. In this type of source to the node, a fiber-optic connection is made. However, from node to multiple delivery ports, DSL lines are required to distribute the internet. DSL lines are connected to the individual routers to create an internet-zone.

Working of Fiber Optic Internet

The general working of a fiber optic internet is discussed below.

  • In the fiber optics internet network, the LED or Laser pulsating light source is utilized. Initially, the data from the internet-server is converted into optical pulses by using fiber optic converters or transmitter units.
  • The data from the transmitter unit is transmitted to the curb, delivery port, or a node through cables.
  • Further, from the curb, node, or delivery port, the routers are connected to generate an internet zone that allows internet access for multiple devices.

Now that the types and working of fiber-optic internet are discussed, it is important to acknowledge the importance of intermediate devices in the fiber-based network. The quality and function of devices like fibers, media converters, connectors, etc are important to get access to high-speed internet. Therefore, one must source these devices from trusted suppliers

Secondary editor and executive officer at Tech Business News. Contracting as an IT support engineer for 20 years Matthew has a passion for sharing his knowledge of the technology industry. He's also an advocate for global cyber security matters.

Matthew Giannelis
Matthew Giannelis
Secondary editor and executive officer at Tech Business News. Contracting as an IT support engineer for 20 years Matthew has a passion for sharing his knowledge of the technology industry. He's also an advocate for global cyber security matters.

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